Nestled in the coastal rainforest of Oaxaca, Mexico is a haven unlike any other. This eco-friendly retreat combines an authentic Mayan experience with modern amenities, including WiFi and 24/7 electricity.

A New Oaxacan Retreat, Where the Jungle Meets the Beach

The “airbnb” is a new Oaxacan retreat, where the jungle meets the beach. It’s a private property that has been designed to be as eco-friendly as possible.

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In the Oaxacan Jungle, a Solar-Powered Escape

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At a beautiful hotel, you may either be lavishly cared for or withdraw further into oneself by reading ancient classics, staring out at a serene scenery, or sitting in a steam room for longer than is probably healthy. All of this is accessible at Terrestre, a new solar-powered hideaway by Grupo Habita in Oaxaca that’s nestled on a quiet cactus-heavy stretch — where the forest meets the beach — just west of Puerto Escondido, the Oaxacan surfer’s enclave that’s become a trendy vacation for city people. The property is hardly more than 14 connected villas in concrete, brick, and wood that rise from the arid “Dune”-esque terrain like some kind of Brutalist encampment; the suites — each of which includes a private soaking pool, a hammock, and walls and ceilings that can be left open to the sun and stars — encourage both outdoor exploration and calm in a rustically minded, minimalist Mexican architect Alberto Kalach and his firm, Taller de Arquitec If you feel like socializing, go to the Mediterranean-inspired al fresco restaurant, any of the hotel’s several plunge pools, or down the dirt road to Casa Wabi, an artistic residence founded by Bosco Sodi and built by Japanese great Tadao Ando, among others, whose architecture is memorable. Terrestrehotel.com has rooms starting at $350.


Hilary Pecis found herself at home with a baby in 2012, following a spell doing digital collages, and began drawing still lifes of her own home. Soon after, she began painting them in acrylic and broadened her scope to include her friends’ chaotic California houses — tables piled high with art books, for example, or corners of rooms crammed with trinkets. She seems to be interested in creating a record of how her generation lives, with its various marks of identity and taste, from Fiji water bottles to Dusen Dusen pillows and Ottolenghi cookbooks, similar to Becky Suss or Jonas Wood. These things are given with a wink, but Pecis isn’t judgemental about them at the end. She adds, “I don’t paint what I don’t like.” Her artworks, on the other hand, are filled with delight. It’s no wonder, however, that her latest exhibition at Rachel Uffner Gallery in New York is named “Warmly,” with the implication that what some call clutter may go a long way toward making a chilly environment seem more welcoming. The collection includes paintings of the nature preserves she’s spent the last several years running through, as well as one that’s nearly a hybrid of the two – a record of outdoor eating depicting the leftovers of a picnic set between planted cactuses. If you can’t make it to the event, the gallery has early copies of Pecis’s first monograph, which will be released on May 3. “Warmly” is on exhibit at Rachel Uffner Gallery, racheluffnergallery.com, from March 12 to May 7.


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Metal Objects for the Home that are Sculptural and Long-Lasting

Maiden Name is an online concept shop featuring an in-house women’s clothing collection that was founded in New York City in 2019 by Alix Freireich and David Lê. The couple then curates a variety of trendy, environmentally conscious products from across the globe each season. “So much of what is being done in design right now is essentially mindless consumerism utilizing really costly materials,” Lê argues. He and Freireich, on the other hand, recently created a line of zero-waste metal products for the household. By the artist Paul Coenen, who is located in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, there’s an end table and a bowl, both essentially consisting of a single curved, laser-cut piece of steel held by its own tension, and within these curving pieces he’s placed smaller, flat sheets resembling fins. Tim Teven, who works at the same studio as Coenen, has designed a chrome vase with a molten, folded base, as well as an elegantly curved metal table with quilted indentations. Then there are the gleaming and hefty ashtrays made from beer cans that were drunk and melted down by Christoph Meier, Ute Müller, Robert Schwarz, and Lucas Stopczynski, a group of European artists who displayed the ashtrays inside a vending machine in the MAK Museum of Applied Arts in Vienna’s recent exhibition “Relax.” But, unlike the museum, wouldn’t it be lovely to use one at home, where you can truly smoke? Maiden-name.com, starting at $200.


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Humidifiers with Cutting-Edge Technology

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The little machine in the corner of the room does more than simply protect your throat and sinuses. Dr. Shereene Idriss, a board-certified dermatologist and the founder of Idriss Dermatology in New York, adds, “A humidifier may transform your whole skin-care game.” “Because heaters dehydrate the air, utilizing a humidifier will replenish moisture and alter how your skin reacts to the environment.” Cindy Kang, co-founder of the Los Angeles-based startup Hey Dewy, was working at Mattel on marketing Barbie dolls and seeking for a replacement for her large, bulky humidifier when she gave up and decided to create her own. The resultant face humidifier, as she refers to it, produces eight hours of mist from a full tank of 12.4 ounces of water and is small enough to sit unobtrusively on a shelf or desk or to travel about with you during the day. Furthermore, whereas previous humidifier models were difficult to clean and so served as breeding grounds for mold, current versions can detect any leftover water and destroy any growth using internal UV LED lights. Dr. Dendy Engelman, a dermatologist, recommends the dishwasher-safe Canopy humidifier for this purpose. And, because we’re all more acquainted with air filter lingo these days, it’s worth noting that Dyson’s Purifier Humidify + Cool machine also has a medical-grade H13 HEPA filter, as well as interwoven silver threads that prevent germs from growing within the evaporator.

Tariq Dixon set out to stretch the limits of the usual showroom when he founded the design studio and curatorial platform Trnk NYC in 2013. His goal was to produce exhibits and partnerships that addressed cultural prejudice in the art and design sectors. He shuttered Trnk’s SoHo store once the pandemic struck, but kept the company alive online and dived into initiatives dealing with social justice and identity. For example, in November 2020, he teamed with Evan Jerry of Studio Anansi, a London-based designer, on a furniture line inspired by the interwoven link between African aesthetics and Western Modernism. Dixon is now launching a new brick-and-mortar location in TriBeCa, on the ground level of a 1920s structure. He wants visitors would “meander and sit with each of the scenes we’ve developed,” which are organized into five unique rooms. One area will function more like a traditional white box gallery and show a rotation of work by different artists — Studio Anansi is up first — while another is set up like a bedroom appointed with a low-slung bed and a velvet sofa from Trnk’s house line. Ceramics by artists such as AnnaLeaClelia Tunesi and Disciplina Studio are on display on a stairwell heading nowhere. Dixon also believes that the area would serve as a breeding ground for new talent and ideas. “It’ll be nice to have a place where all of our many apparently different ideas become an unified vision as we find more artists, make new friends, and explore more dialogues,” he adds. trnk-nyc.com.


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Balenciaga puts up an enthralling show.

Zipolite is a beach in Oaxaca, Mexico. It’s a beautiful place that offers an amazing view of the ocean. The sand is white and the water is blue. There are also plenty of places to eat and drink. The “zipolite beach” is one that you should visit if you get the chance to go to Oaxaca.

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